The Law of Compounding

If you publish amazing, quality content and work to build your online audience of quality followers, they’ll share it with their own audiences on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, their own blogs and more.

The Future of Mobile

Users are no longer happy with cookie-cutter relationships with their apps. They want personalized experiences and app content that maps to their preferences, needs and locations. They know you have data on them, and as long as you respect and protect their privacy, they are OK with letting you use it to create a better experience. The problem is businesses are not thinking big when it comes to meeting those expectations …

Think about it!

Earn free Bitcoins

Bitcoins – the latest big thing on the money market, a virtual currency with a hype! You too can get Bitcoins, either by buying them or by earning them for free. Follow this link to receive your free Bitcoin mine:

Ore-Mine.org

Growth hacking

growthhackingGrowth hacking is a marketing technique developed by technology startups which uses creativity, analytical thinking, and social metrics to sell products and gain exposure. It can be seen as part of the online marketing ecosystem, as in many cases growth hackers are simply good at using techniques such as search engine optimization, website analytics, content marketing and A/B testing which are already mainstream.

Growth hackers focus on low-cost and innovative alternatives to traditional marketing, e.g. utilizing social media and viral marketing instead of buying advertising through more traditional media such as radio, newspaper, and television.

Growth hacking is particularly important for startups, as it allows for a “lean” launch that focuses on “growth first, budgets second”. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, AirBnB and Dropbox are all companies that use growth hacking techniques.

I hate to say it, but I told you so …

This came as an email from Google on July 6, 2014:

A Farewell to Orkut

After ten years of sparking conversations and forging connections, we have decided that it’s time for us to start saying goodbye to Orkut. Over the past decade, YouTube, Blogger and Google+ have taken off, with communities springing up in every corner of the world. Because the growth of these communities has outpaced Orkut’s growth, we’ve decided to focus our energy and resources on making these other social platforms as amazing as possible for everyone who uses them.

We will shut down Orkut on 30 September 2014. Until then, there will be no impact on you, so you may have time to manage the transition. You can export your profile data, community posts and photos using Google Takeout (available until September 2016). We are preserving an archive of all public communities, which will be available online from 30 September 2014. If you don’t want your posts or name to be included in the community archive, you can remove Orkut permanently from your Google account. Please visit our Help Centre for any further details.

It’s been a great 10 years, and we apologise to those of you still actively using the service. We hope that you will find other online communities to spark more conversations and build even more connections for the next decade and beyond.